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Wild animations in the sky? Ancient advanced astronomy is the ancient cave art



The world's oldest cave paintings reveal how astronomical knowledge of ancient times was.

Artworks seen on European sites are pictures of wild beasts as before. Instead, the animal symbols represent star stars in the night sky, and is used to represent dates, indicating analytics, such as comet strikes.

From the Altamira cave, Cantabria reconstructed paintings in Pesalithic cave from Cantabria and Spain. 20,000 years ago (Solothrian). (Thomas Quince / CC By SA 2.0)

From the Altamira cave, Cantabria reconstructed paintings in Pesalithic cave from Cantabria and Spain. 20,000 years ago (Solothrian). (Thomas Quince / CC By SA 2.0)

Keep track of time

They have found time to learn how humans can change their lives over the millions of years 40,000 years ago.

Discoveries suggest that ancient people understood the effect of a gradual change of Earth's orbit. The discovery of this phenomenon was the predecessor of the ancient Greeks.

People can determine the date within 250 years before men reside in Western Europe.

Neanderthal reconstruction in the museum. (Public domain)

Neanderthal reconstruction in the museum. ( Public domain )

Ancient Extensive Astronomy Insights

The findings indicate that astronomical observations of the ancient people were much higher than previously believed. Their understanding of our understanding of human migration in prehistoric times helped them open up the open sea.

Researchers from Edinburgh and Kent University have studied details of Palaeolytic and Neootic Arts, which show animals in symbols in Turkey, Spain, France and Germany.

Though distinctly separated by tens of thousands of years, they have found all the sites that have been used in all sorts of time in modern astronomy.

Evidence in important historical places

One of these places was discovered by a stone-studded study by researchers – Gobblys tycoon in modern Turkey – In 11000 he was interpreted as a monument of a destructive cometary stroke. The strike was called Mini Paints.

& # 39; Wulcher-Stone & # 39; GizBeli in the tea. Credit: Alastair Comps

& # 39; Wulcher-Stone & # 39; GizBeli in the tea. Credit: Alistair Combs

The Laxock Shaf's scene in France – they decompose the most famous ancient works of art. The exhibition of deaths and animals may be reminiscent of a comet stake in BC 15,200.

Lancock 4, Mandinek, Dordogne, France. The pictures are on the side called the ultimate. (Public domain)

Lancock 4, Mandinek, Dordogne, France. The pictures are on the side called the ultimate. (Public domain)

Their findings have been confirmed by comparing many of the tablets – known from the colored brackets – the positions of ancient stars, as predicted in the early modern software.

From the 38000 BC, the dominant sculpture of the Hohenstein-Stable Cave, the oldest sculpture in the world, was an example of this ancient system of things.

The Lion Man of Holenstein-Steady Cave. (Dagmar Holman / CC By SA 4.0)

The Lion Man of Holenstein-Steady Cave. (Dagmar Holman / CC By SA 4.0)

This study was published Athens History of History .

Doctor of School of Engineering at Edinburgh The study was carried out by Martin Sweenmann.

"In the early cave, people were aware of the night sky in the ice age, and today they are not different for us, and these findings support a theory of different comet influences of human development, and revolutionize how people in prehistoric times look."

Edinburgh University's analysis suggests that the world's oldest cave paintings, ancient resurgence, astronomy, and animal symbols represent star stars in the night sky, and the date and event are similar to the comet strikes. Source: Alister Coir

& # 39; Art & Collage & # 39; The first appeared in Science Duration.

Edinburgh University. "Prehistoric caves refers to ancient use of ancient astronomy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 November 2018.

References

Martin B Skateman, Alistair Combs. & # 39; European Philosophical Art Decoding: Unusual Significance Very Ancient Knowledge . & # 39; Athens History of History , 2018. Available here: https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.00046


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